Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 49th World Congress on Microbiology London, UK.

Day 1 :

  • Food Microbiology

Session Introduction

Marina Sidorenko

Federal Scientific Center of the East Asia Terrestrial Biodiversity, Russia

Title: Listeria monocytogenes under the influence of food plants
Biography:

Marina Sidorenko has completed his PhD in two specialties: soil science and microbiology. She is a leading researcher at the FSCEATB FEB RAS. She has published over 35 articles in well-known journals and 4 patents of the Russian Federation, is a member of the editorial board and reviewer of several journals. Her areas of interest are applied microbiology, soil microbiome, sanitary microbiology. Vladislav Sidorenko is a student of PRMU. She has a 3 articles in scientific journal. Hers scientific interests: medical microbiology, epidemiology, infectious diseases.

 

Abstract:

Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of human and animal listeriosis. It is known that the classical bacterial forms of Listeria, being saprophytes, have high stability in the external environment, they are able to reproduce in various environmental objects, including in soils and plants. It is known that plants can be a natural reservoir of pathogenic Listeria and a source of human infection. Volatile organic emissions of germinating seeds, due to the high penetrating ability in the soil, availability for assimilation, can be a source of carbon and energy for soil microorganisms. It is known that not all bacteria are capable of assimilating the volatile metabolites of germinating seeds, and the specificity of the action of volatile organic compounds depends on both the type of bacteria and the type of germinated seeds. Therefore, the volatile metabolites of germinating seeds of cultivated plants were studied, which are factors of transmission of L. monocytogenes - lettuce (Zactuca sativa), corn (Zea mays L.). As a result, it is proved that the volatile metabolites of germinating plant seeds stimulate the growth and reproduction of pathogenic listeria in soils. The specificity of the action of volatile organic compounds of plants on the reproduction of the studied bacteria is noted. The main volatile fraction that affects the growth and reproduction of L. monocytogenes is methanol, which bacteria use as their sole source of carbon and energy.

 

Siane Luzzi

Research and Teaching Assistant University of Minnesota, USA

Title: Recycling dairy wastewater to produce microalgae biomass and livestock feeding
Biography:

Abstract:

Inefficient use of nitrogen and phosphorus leads to anthropogenic eutrophication of rivers, lakes, and oceanic basis worldwide, causing an environmental problem that can trigger a death cycle of an entire water body. Microalga, oneof the organisms that benefit from the excessive nutrient runoff and uses the sunlight to catalyze reactions that cause eutrophication, can also be part of a solution. The study presented in this thesis represents a possible integrated solution for the nutrients accumulated, especially in dairy farms. This work shows how it is possible to treat dairy wastewater in large volumes, using plastic photobioreactors with an initial inoculum of microalgae, in this case, Chlorella sp., in a mixotrophic solution (since the dairy wastewater used in this study was not sterilized). It was also shown that in pilot-scale, ratio 1:10 (dairy wastewater in water) was capable of removing high amounts of nutrients, up to 97.55% of ammonium, 39.27% of nitrate, and 27.05% of phosphate. The 1:10 was also capable of producing competitive biomass amounts when comparing to the controls, 1.575 ± 0.599 g/L and 1.315 ± 0.240 g/L Moreover, none of the treatments (control, controlN, 1:10, 1:10N, 1:30 and 1:30N) were significantly different from each other, considering the nutrients ( ,  ,  ) removal rates and biomass, when adding or not extra CO2. Besides, a study was carried to evaluate the taste preference of calves fed Chlorella sp. produced in the previous steps. Sterilized biomass was used for feeding trials with six Holstein and crossbred dairy heifer calves. No mycotoxins were found in the biomass, and many heavy metals were tested, having the levels below the maximum content recommended for animal feeding. The microalgae biomass produced had a protein content of 49.2%, 2.32% of fat, 38.5% of carbohydrates, and around 10% of different minerals and nutrients. They were fed 0, 30, and 60 g of Chlorella sp. daily in a sequential elimination study. No difference was found for dry matter intake of calves fed 0, 30, or 60 g of Chlorella sp., indicating that microalgae may be added to the rations of calves without any adverse effects.

 

  • Bacteriology, Bacterial Pathogens & Associated diseases

Session Introduction

Deepika Ramachandra

Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, India

Title: Microbial spectrum and antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from plastic bags
Biography:

Deepika Ramachandra graduated from medical school, Bangalore Medical College. She has been extensively involved in the field of research, has presented in numerous international conferences, awarded Best Paper for her previous presentations. She has received prestigious International Award for Young People by HRH Duke of Edinburgh. She is also a national level athlete with numerous records held in her name. She is also member of various NGO’s and involved in a lot of philanthropy both in India and US.

 

Abstract:

Plastic is convenient, lightweight, unbreakable and relatively inexpensive. However, there are both environmental and health risk from the widespread use of plastics. Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that mimics the action of the human hormone estrogen, can leach from polycarbonate plastic. Bisphenol A has been found to stimulate prostate cancer cells7 and causes breast tissue changes in mice that resemble early stages of breast cancer in both mice and humans. Reusable bags for transport of groceries from the store to the consumer’s home have become popular in recent years. Since these bags are often reused, and used potentially for multiple purposes, the possibility for contamination of food products as well as the consumer’s hands. Most food borne illnesses are believed to originate in the home. Reuse of bags creates an opportunity for cross contamination of foods. Study was to assess the potential for cross contamination of food products from reusable bags used to carry groceries. It is recommended that the public needs to be educated about the proper care of educated about the proper care of reusable bags by printed instructions on the bags or through public service announcements improper cooking or handling of foods. Reusable bags if not properly washed between uses, create the potential for cross contamination of foods. The common use of bags for other purposes than carrying groceries is also a potential concern. Thus, a sudden or significant increase in use of reusable bags without a major public education campaign on how to reduce the risk of cross contamination would create the risk of significant adverse public health impacts. Shoppers who do not regularly wash their reusable grocery bags may be placing themselves and their families at heightened risk of food borne illness. Reusable bags, if not properly washed between uses, create the potential for cross-contamination of food. This risk can be increased by the growth of bacteria in the bags. Fortunately, washing the bags by machine or hand reduced bacterial presence to nearly zero. Reusable grocery bags can be a breeding ground for dangerous food-borne bacteria and pose a serious risk to public health. Bacteria levels found in reusable bags were significant enough to cause a wide range of serious health problems and even death. They are a particular danger for young children, who are especially vulnerable to food-borne illnesses. Antibiotic sensitivity test was performed on all bacterial isolates against 15 antibiotics (representing different class of antibiotics) by Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method on Mueller Hilton agar by using CLSI guidelines. Zones of incubations at 37 C to nearest millimeter with a slide gauge.

 

  • Virology, Viral Pathogens and Associated Diseases
Biography:

K. M. Yacob is a practicing physician in the field of healthcare in the state of Kerala in India for the last 30 years and very much interested in basic research. His interest is spread across the fever, inflammation and back pain. He is a writer. He has printed and published nine books on these subjects. He wrote hundreds of articles in various magazines.After scientific studies, He have developed 8000 affirmative cross checking questions. It can explain all queries related to fever

 

Abstract:

We have been hearing for centuries that ‘fever is not a disease but a symptom’. Physicians say that fever is a symptom of diseases like flu to cancer.The conservative fever definition, diagnosis, and treatments are based on fever as a symptom.All the studies related to fever as a symptom of a disease have been done without knowing the Purpose of the temperature of fever is. Without knowing the Purpose of the temperature of fever, how can fever included in the symptom definition? Temperature between 38o to 41o centigrade can be symptom of a disease? Most of the diseases may not have a fever. Sometimes it disappears. Then, is fever a symptom of which disease? Symptom Definition is the only parameter necessary for a Symptom. As with any or all other definitions, symptom definition should describe the symptom scientifically. If it cannot describe clearly, there is no use of a symptom definition. A symptom is a departure from normal function or feeling which is noticed only by a patient, indicating the presence of disease or abnormality.In fever, both symptoms of disease and symptoms of Fever are included. Deduct symptom of disease from total symptoms, we will get symptoms of fever. In fever does not show any actions of temperature rise. How can we prove the fever is not a symptom? The fever is not symptom when examined in various directions.   In fever, both symptoms of disease and symptoms of fever are included. Deduct symptom of disease from total symptoms, we will get symptoms of fever. We can separate signs, signals, and actions of both fever and disease and rising temperature. Temperature between 38 degrees and 41 degrees cannot be a symptom of any of the diseases.  A different cause of diseases like virus, bacteria, fungi, venom, horror scene, and horror dream never shows the same symptoms.Fever has never been scientifically proved as a symptom of a disease. Fever has the properties of adaptation. If we ask any type of question-related to fever by assuming that the fever is not a symptom we will get a clear answer. If we avoid or evade from this we will never get a proper answer to even a single question.

 

  • Antimicrobial Agents & Resistance
Biography:

Hamza A. Aboelenin is an Experienced Quality control Microbiologist and researcher with a demonstrated history of working in the pharmaceuticals industry Strong research professional with a Bachelor of Science (BS) focused in Environmental Science & Microbiology from Alexandria University.

 

Abstract:

The validation of the disinfectants in the pharmaceutical industry environment is essential process to be sure of the disinfection process of it.The Aim of the study is to determine the efficacy of Dettol disinfectant in compare to the used disinfectants (chlorine – phenol – alcohol) on different surfaces (Epoxy – stainless steel – glass) in the production environment

Four concentration (5,2.5,1.25and.625 %) of Dettol was compared to chlorine 1% and phenol 5% and alcohol 70% in time intervals 5, 10,15and 30 minutes  and approached to Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa  ATCC 9027, Aspergillusniger ATCC 16404 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 using suspension test .Then the most significance concentration of Dettol and in the shortest contact time compared to the other disinfectants in the shortest contact time using surface test on different surfaces (Epoxy – stainless steel – glass) in the production environment. The efficacies calculated by log reductions are calculated according to the following equation: Log10 reduction (R) = log10 pre-value cfu/plate– log10 post value cfu/plate. A sample of four replicates were used per organism per concentration at different time intervals to estimate an overage change at log reduction equal 2 units with estimated standard deviation (SD)equal 0.5 for each sub group, using  α error equal 0.05 will provide a power of 20% . The results elaborated that the most significance concentration of Dettol is 2.5% in contact time 5 minutes and chlorine 1% in contact time 10 min phenol5% in contact time 10 min alcohol 70%in contact time 10 min.

 

  • Pharmaceutical Biotechnology

Session Introduction

Paula Istvan

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

Title: Metabolic pathways of RDX degraders isolated from explosive contaminated environments
Biography:

Paula Istvan has completed his PhD from University of Brasilia, Brazil in Biotecnology and she is doing postdoctoral studies in the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. She has experience in recombinant protein purification process development, molecular biology, enzymology and bioinformatics. A comprehensive intercultural and international experience (Romanian with and PhD in Brazil doing PD in Israel).

 

Abstract:

The RDX, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, is an explosive, extensively used by the military and in the construction industry. It poses harmful and deleterious threats to the environment and causes soil, sediment, and groundwater contamination. The microorganisms involved in RDX biodegradation are limited by a small fraction of RDX isolates, because approximately 99% of microorganisms are uncultivable under laboratory conditions. Using a cultivation-independent molecular technique as sequencing is necessary to probe the insight into RDX-degrading microorganisms. Rhodococcus YH1 and Rhodococcus T7 and Gordonia YY1 stains were isolated from contaminated environments and cultivated with RDX as sole nitrogen source. Genomic DNA was extracted from a single colony and sequencing was performed using an Illumina Miseq2v-500 to generate 250x2paired-end reads. Raw sequence data were quality trimmed, and de novo  assembly was performed in the software package Spades. Prokka tool was used to annotate the genome using the UniProt database. Plasmid Spades program from Spades package were used for plasmid assembly. The draft genome of all stains is approximately 6 Mb, distributed in more the 200 Scaffolds. The average coverage was approximately 35X. The annotation identified unique genes, coding sequences, transfer-messenger RNA, transfer RNAs and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR). The functional information was analyzed both individually and as in metabolic networks generated by KEGG Pathway Maps. This genomes analyses will improve our knowledge of RDX degradation genes and metabolic pathways and contribute to the development of more efficient bioremediation of polluted environments.

 

  • Microbial/Industrial biotechnology
Biography:

Sanusi Magaji is a carrier academic with special interest in biological sciences specifically molecular biology, health sciences and bioinformatics. Born 1979 in Bauchi city of Nigeria, Sanusi holds a bacheclor of technology from ATB University Bauchi, PGD public health ATB Bauchi, Msc Molecular Biology with Bioinformatics University of Wolverhampton. Sanusi is a lecturer at the department of science lab. Tech. ATAPOLY Bauchi Nigeria. Sanusi has a special interest on bioinformatics analysis of CCR5 in HIV therapeutics.

 

Abstract:

Two experiments on alkaline lysis method of plasmid DNA isolation was carried out utilizing strains of E.coli JM109, a non- pathogenic bacteria that has been deliberately disabled. Restriction digests and gel electrophoresis carried out. The result of the first gel electrophoresis reveals only traces of RNA, hence no DNA fragments on the samples loaded labeled A to D this could be attributed to possible contamination from the procedures. For the second gel electrophoresis samples, A is plasmid free, B and C contains small fragments approximately 2.3 to 5.6 and D contains the fertility plasmids.

 

  • Agriculture & Forest Microbiology
Biography:

Helena Gutierrez Olivera is a PhD candidate at Centro de Estudos Nucleares na Agricultura,  Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. She completed her masters at the age of 24, on agricultural enthomology at Universidade Estadual Paulista, Brazil. Currently, she also works as a biology teacher at hight shool level.

 

Abstract:

Soil pollution caused by heavy metals is a global concern that has been increasing due to industrial development and mining residues. Bioremediation is the use of living organisms to remove or neutralize pollutants from a contaminated site.  Among the possible strategies, phytoremediation is the direct use of green plants and their associated micro-organisms to stabilize or reduce contamination in soils. This study analyzed the inoculation efficiency of fungus Mucor nidicola in tomato Solanum lycopersicum and its role in plant resistance to heavy metals. The fungus tested was isolated from the roots of plants from a site contaminated with heavy metals and it showed good resistance to cadmiun when tested in vitro. First, we tested nine methodologies for the fungus inoculation on tomato plants. Then, the plant-fungus interaction was studied in the presence of cadmium to analyze the fungus as a plant resistance promoter. The inoculation techniques that applied short-time chemical scarification were not efficient and neither were the methodologies that placed a disk of the mycelium with the seed during the germination process. Spraying the plants with mycelium solution was also inefficient. The long-term chemical scarification and direct contact between seeds and sporum resulted in fungal inoculation, even though it occurred at a low frequency. The plant-fungus interaction test in presence of CdCl2 confirmed the negative effect of this compound on plant development, but there was no significant effect of fungus inoculation in terms of improving plant performance in such conditions. Further research on the improvement of the inoculation technique with M. nidicola on tomato or other species is of great importance to enable the development of new viable phytoremediation techniques.

 

  • Biotechnology

Session Introduction

Kristina de Corpo

Independent Researcher, USA

Title: Can biotechnology help us reduce entropy within our physical bodies
Biography:

Kristina de Corpo is a brand strategist and passionately believes brands that serve a meaningful purpose in our lives have the ability and power to create real systemic change in our world. Her goal is to bring the science of how we experience a quantum reality through our awareness into a brand expression that can be accessed by mainstream global culture. Her objective is to influence our understanding of what it means to maintain a quantum mindset that experiences possible reality out of infinite possibilities, over experiencing probability as we experience reality. Bringing this understanding to education through new pedagogy and curriculum is her ultimate goal. She has published over 25 papers that explore how we experience a quantum Universe to consider the connection between relativity and quantum theory. Her work has been read in over 90 countries.

 

Abstract:

My work explores this reality as a whole vibration where we only experience 5% of it as normal matter. Which means we are resisting 95% of the vibration in how we experience reality in terms of how we experience the waves of information as matter. In other words, we are not experiencing constructive interference where we are amplifying the energy within the waves, we are experiencing deconstructive interference where we are cancelling the information of the waves out as we are experience reality, which disconnects the waves. Our resistance to the whole vibration is causing probable states of reality over possible states of reality that are relative to what the whole vibration is experiencing as one organism within 100% of this reality. As “free radicals” our energy is being used to maintain the velocity of our particles experiencing the additional volume of expanded space as probable states of reality, over experiencing possible states of reality relative to what the whole vibration is simultaneously experiencing.My work explores the idea that similar to nature, we have the ability to release our electrons to form a harmonized standing wave of vibration to the whole vibration in order to become aware of possible reality that maintains relativity within the whole vibration through connected waves of matter as information. And it is the resistance to the whole vibration by only experiencing 5% of the whole vibration that “disconnects” the waves and also causes molecular disorder in our physical bodies. My work applies to biotechnology in the sense that I believe there are ways technology can assist us to measure if and when we insulate our electrons over releasing them to maintain being a complete circuit of information within singularity as it relates to our experience of the the field as reality. I believe technology can also assist us in measuring how divided our awareness is from the whole vibration as we experience reality through the rate of flow of electromagnetic energy we allow through our daily experience of reality. Maintaining relativity is learning to be the whole organism but allowing yourself to be your own unique variable within how you experience your reality. Your energy is then being used efficiently within your own awareness as any state of matter within the whole vibration and you experience more homeostasis within the systems of your own physical body by maintaining enthalpy within the whole vibration.

 

  • Agriculture & Forest Microbiology | Food Microbiology | Industrial Microbiology, Microbial Biotechnology and Future Bioindustries | Antimicrobial Agents & Resistance | Virology, Viral Pathogens and Associated Diseases | Environmental Microbiology | Industrial Microbiology, Microbial Biotechnology and Future Bioindustries
Location: Webinar

Session Introduction

Agudelo-Restrepo Manuela

Grupo Sustancias activas y biotecnología. Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Medellín, Colombia

Title: Mosquito-larvicidal activity of bacterial extracts produced by Colombian strains
Biography:

Manuela Agudelo Restrepo has completed his studies in biological enginniering at the National University of Colombia, Medellin in 2019. She is studying a Master in Biotechnology at the same university. She has participated in several research projects carried out by the research group in Active Substances and Biotechnology to which she belongs since 2016. She is an outstanding student.

Abstract:

Mosquito-borne diseases have become a health problem due to their serious economic and social implications. Mosquitoes can transmit more than 30 viruses as dengue, zika, yellow fever and

chikungunya. Dengue is one of the most common human diseases transmitted by mosquitoes. It is estimated that more than 2.5 billion people are at risk and 390 million infections occur annually in around 125 countries that are exposed due to their location in tropical and subtropical regions (Marques et al., 2017). In order to control mosquito populations various practices have been used in endemic areas, including the use of chemical insecticides, which has been one of the main strategies. However, the application of synthetic insecticides cause problems as development of resistance, adverse effects on beneficial organisms destroying the natural and fundamental balance of ecosystems, not to mention even the damage caused by environmental pollution.The aim of this study was to identify larvicidal activity of extracts produced by bacteria isolated from different sources in Colombia. A total of 105 extracts produced from the same number of bacteria were evaluated for their activity against larvae A. aegypti and A. albopictus using standard protocols. Six extracts showed relevant activity (more than 50% of mosquito larvae were killed after 48 hours), two of them showed to be actives against larvae of Aedes aegypti and four against larvae of Aedes albopictus. An extract produced by a Colombian strain of Bacillus atrophaeus was selected for further studies. In order to increase the production of active substances, different culture media were evaluated. A culture media containing glycerol as carbon source was selected. Bacterial extracts are a good source for the search of new strategies in the control of mosquitoes. Further studies to determine the compound responsible for the insecticidal activity are in progress.

Shyam Narayan

Indian council of medical research- Rajendra memorial research institute of medical sciences, Patna-800007, India

Title: Modulation of the immune response and infection pattern to Leishmania donovani in visceral leishmaniasis due to arsenic exposure: An in vitro study
Biography:

More than 25years research experience in the field of leishmaniasis to reveal the resistant isolates demography, their role in protective cytokine diversion, control of parasitic anemia in visceral leishmaniasis as well as identification of phytopharmaceutical anti-leishmanial candidate and also to identify the candidate for vector based vaccine development against leishmaniasis.

Abstract:

The arsenic contamination of ground water in visceral leishmaniasis (VL) endemic areas in Bihar, India leads to human exposure through drinking water. Possibly, the consumed arsenic (As) accumulates in the tissues of VL patients, who subsequently internalize intracellular amastigotes to confer resistance against chemotherapy to the parasite, leading to modulation in the host’s immune response. This hypothesis appears to be consistent with the in vitro findings that in arsenic-exposed parasites, the mitochondrial membrane potential became depolarized, whereas the reduced thiol and lactate production was overexpressed with enhanced glucose consumption; therefore, the reduced thiol possibly supports an immunosuppressive state in the host cells. This observation was well supported by the down-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) with a suppressed anti-leishmanial function of macrophage (NO, ROS). In contrast, the pathophysiological mechanism of VL has received ample support by the promotion of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) in the presence of arsenic-exposed Leishmania parasites (LdAS). Dysfunction of mitochondria and the overexpression of lactate production raise the possibility of the Warburg effect being operative through the up-regulation of glucose consumption by parasites to enhance the energy production, possibly augmenting virulence. Therefore, we surmise from our data that arsenic exposure to Leishmania donovani modulates the immune response and infection pattern by impairing parasite function, which may affect the anti-leishmanial effect in VL.

Tormal Djassinra

Laboratoire de microbiologie appliquée, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Tofaïl, BP 133, 14000, Kénitra, Morocco

Title: Behavior of Xanthomonas fragariae Dw in an inorganic medium enriched with N, P, or K
Biography:

Dr. Djassinra Tormal. I received my Ph.D in sciences of enviromment from university Ibn Tofail in 2016. After completion of my degree, I was appointed as a faculty fellow in the Department of Health and enviromment at the University of Ibn Tofail. I served as the Head of Study of antibacterial and antifugal activities of two medecinal plants growing wild in the Gharb region (Chenopodium ambrosiodes l and Rosmarinus officinalis l from 2014-2016. My interests are focused on the use of microbiology to study the antibacterial and antioxidant effect of medicinal plant on Antibiotic Resistant Strains in 2016. Chemistry agro resources, polymers and process engineering.

Abstract:

In this study, the behavior of Xanthomonas fragariae, angular leaf spot of strawberry agent, was followed in the AB medium, enriched with nitrogen, phosphorus or with potassium, and in the soil of the Mamora forest with 14% to 28% of humidity in function of these fertilizer elements. The obtained results have shown that Na2HPO4 and NH4Cl, used, 0.01 and 0.05 mol/l, respectively as a phosphorus and nitrogen source, have a significant effect on the survival of Xanthomonas fragariae. By contrast, KCl, used as a source of Potassium, has no significant effect on the number of culturable cells.

The three sources used NPK, 14% and 28% showed a great influence on the number of culturable cells of Xanthomonas fragariae, either increasing or decreasing. Potassium, at 28 to 14% of humidity, inhibited the rate growth of Xanthomonas, while the phosphorus and nitrogen stimulated its growth, greater than 28% of humidity than 14%. Similarly the bacterial growth was not affected during the incorporation of NPK at different concentrations in the soil of Mamora.

Biography:

Venice is in the fourth year of her PhD study at Univeristy of Hong Kong. She graduated from the Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences (BbiomedSc) with first class honour and started her PhD study with the entrance scholarship, Jessie Ho Memorial Postgraduate Scholarship in 2016.

Abstract:

Aminoglycosides is one of the oldest class of antibiotics. Its history started with the discovery of Streptomycin, the first-in-class antibiotic, by Selman Waksman in 1944. However, its usefulness was highly eroded by the emerging resitance in recent years. The conventional strategy of developing novel antibiotics leads to selection of resistant strains, rendering new drugs ineffectiveness. Thus, rejuvenating the therapeutic potential of existing antibiotics offers a rational yet novel strategy. Using a cell-based screen of 50,240 small-molecule compounds, we identified a potent compound with low cytotoxicity, SA-558, that potentiate gentamicin activity against Vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus Mu3. SA-558 potentiates activity of different members of antibiotics in the class of aminoglycosides, but not kasugamycin against S. aureus Mu3. The SA-558 gentamicin-potentiating activity is generally observed in gram-positive bacteria but not in gram-negative bacteria. Resistance towards SA-558 activity is difficult to arise. Here, we demonstrated that SA-558, a novel compound, is of high potential to rejuvenate the potency of aminoglycosides, one of the oldest class antibiotics, for clinical application.

Biography:

Mukta Das Gupta is a PhD student at Medical School of Australian National University (ANU). She obtained her bachelor degree in Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) and Master of Science (MS) in Microbiology at Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Bangladesh. She is currently holding a position as an Assistant Professor in Department of Microbiology and Veterinary Public Health at Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, CVASU, Bangladesh. Her research interests are in the area of microbial genomics and bioinformatics.

Mukta has been awarded Endeavour Postgraduate Scholarship, 2017 to do her PhD under the supervision of Dr Claire O' Brien.

Abstract:

Several lines of evidence implicate bacteria in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and Escherichia coli is one of the leading candidate triggers. Our aim was to identify genes of E. coli associated with IBD.This study involved whole genome comparisons of 179 E. coli strains, isolated from 64 Crohn’s disease (CD) patients, 18 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and 19 controls. These isolates were obtained from different tissues and sources, such as aphthous ulcers, lymph nodes and intestinal mucosa. We used A5 MiSeq to assemble sequences, PROKKA for annotation, ROARY for pan-genome analyses, and SCOARY to assess phenotype-genotype relationships. We determined the serotype, sequence type (ST), virulence genes, plasmids, bacteriophage, CRISPRs, capsules, bacteriocins, and antibiotic resistance genes for each strain. CD-associated E. coli were phylogenetically diverse. The most abundant E. coli phylogroup was B2 and the most common ST was ST95. The E. coli UTI89 plasmid was significantly associated with paediatric CD isolates compared with controls. Based on total gene content, CD isolates were significantly associated with particular genes associated with adhesion, the toxin-antitoxin system, plasmid partitioning, conjugation transfer, and signal recognition when compared to controls.  Genes associated with adhesion and invasion and peroxide scavenging were significantly associated with lymph node E. coli isolates from CD patients. Our findings suggest that CD-associated E. coli are associated with genes involved in adhesion, and the lymph node strains have properties that allow them to survive intracellularly, within phagolysosomes. This study provides insights into the potential role of E. coli in the pathogenesis of IBD.

Biography:

Marie-Thérèse Giudici-Orticoni is director of the Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Protein Engineering, director of the Mediterranean Institute of Microbiology (350 people), director of the Institute of Microbiology, Bioenergy and Biotechnology of Aix-Marseille University (10 laboratories, 14 platforms). Her group has characterized the main metabolic chains of micro-organisms, and now studying their dynamics and interactions under different conditions. She has initiated an innovative axis of ecological engineering, which consists in the microbial study of bacterial consortia involved in bioH2 production. The objective is to establish the parameters governing the metabolic networks in view of biotechnological applications. She is author of 98 publications in refereed journals, scientific coordinator for national and international programs.

Abstract:

Formation of multi-species communities allows nearly every niche on earth to be colonized. Exchange of molecular information among neighbouring bacteria in such communities is crucial for the bacteria to thrive. Yet the principles controlling these inter-species interactions are poorly defined. To shed light on them, we developed a synthetic microbial consortium with two anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium acetobutylicum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. these 2 bacterai can be found together in Nature involved in anaerobic digestion of organic waste matter nd in consequence in BIO-H2 production. Our studies demonstrate that for cell-cell interaction can allow to overcome nutrient starvation and that many materials can passed from one cell to another. This physical interaction induces changes in the distribution of metabolic fluxes and allows a substantial increase in H2 production without requiring genetic engineering. We identify that the agent necessary for these physical interactions between C. acetobutylicum and D. vulgaris (or E. coli and D. vulgaris), with the consequent metabolic exchanges, is the quorum-sensing molecule.

Xinggang Liao

School of Biological Sciences, Guizhou Education University, Guiyang, Guizhou 550018, P. R. China

Title: Comparison study on host plant growth promotion by different Metarhizium species
Biography:

Xinggang Liao has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from Southwest University in China and postdoctoral studies from Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) in USA. He is the department chairman of Applied Biological Sciences, Guizhou Education University. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Metarhizium spp. is a kind of important entomopathogenic fungi, which has been widely applied as biological control agents in China and rest of the world. Besides killing target insects, these fungi could also survive in soils in natural environment. Partial strains could even colonize host plant root during saprophytic phase and some of them are able to promote host plants growth. Here, we tested the rhizosphere competence among different Metarhizium species (M. robertsii - Mr2575, Mr23 and Mr1046, M. anisopliae - Ma808, Ma932 and Ma939, M. brunneum - Mb820, Mb1187 and Mb2974 and M. acridum - Mac324) and their effects on corn growth, which is one of the primary cereal crops in Guizhou province. All strains colonized corn roots but Mb1187 and Mac324 had less rhizospheric populations than other strains during the one-month pot trial. In addition, Mb1187 and Mac324 failed to promote corn growth possibly due to their poor rhizosphere competence. In contrast, rhizospheric populations and growth promotion by rest of the strains were significantly increased. The Mr23, Ma939 and Mb820 strains demonstrated maximal increase in corn vegetative growth such as leaf collar formation and stalk growth, and thereafter were selected as qualified candidates for further virulence test on some indigenous underground pests.

Ratageri R.H.

Department of P.G. Studies in Botany, Govt Science College, Chitradurga, Karnataka, India

Title: Isolation and characterization of rhizosphere mycoflora in some agricultural crop plants
Biography:

Dr. Ramesh H Ratageri has completed M.Sc, M.Phil,Ph.D from karnataka University and working as Associate Professor, Post Graduate Deparment of Botany Governement  Science college Chitradurga,karnataka INDIA.I have 25 years of teaching experiance. I have attended several national and International level conferences/seminars. I have visited and presented the research paper in SETAC, New Orleans, North America.I have published more than 25 research papers and also articles.I have evaluated M.Sc Dissertation work. I have published two books and six chapters in different books and also a member of BOE. BOS and BOAE of Microbiology and Botany,Kuvempu University and Daverege University,Karanatak. I received District leve Best NSS Programe Officer.

Abstract:

Rhizosphere is a soil ecological region where soil is subjected to specific influence by plant root due to the interface. The great array of root- microbe interactions results in the development of a dynamic environment known as the rhizosphere where microbial communities also interact. The differing physical, chemical, and biological properties of the root – associated soil compared with those of the root – free bulk soil, are responsible for changes in microbial diversity and for increased numbers and activity of microorganisms in the rhizosphere micro – environment Experiments were carried out in the P.G Department of Botany and Microbiology, Government Science Chitradurga. Chitradurga located at 140 14N 76` 24`E/ 14.230N 76.40E it has average elevation of 732m (2401 ft). Characterization of mycoflora in phyllosphere and Rhizosphere were done with the help of K.R.Aneja( 1996). Macerated slides and spores were photographed by using digital camera Nikon D500.Our investigation reveals that their enough diversity in the fungal flora from the study area  The highest number of fungal species obtained as Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus flavipes, Aspergillus fumigatous, Aspergillus terrusfollowed by Curvularia,Chetomonium, Cladosporium, Penicillium, Fusarium & Trichoderma. Which constitutes 70% dominant Aspergillus and remaining species 30%.This study shows that Colony Fungal Unit (cfu) /plate were always higher during evening exposure period than morning period. When the comparison is made between the four sites with respect to the total number of colonies per site, the highest numbers of colonies were recorded in the crops like Jowar and Ragi than Maize and Mustard.Therefore the present investigation reveals that four sites containing more number of mycofloral diversity in the study area.

Biography:

Ms Xueqing Wang is a PhD Candaidate from the School of Medical and Health Sciences at Edith Cowan University. Her PhD Project is ‘How Coxsackievirus B3 Infection Acts as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus by Triggering Autophagy and Persistent Inflammation’. She has published 5 papers as the co-author in reputed journals and won the 2nd price in the australian academic transformation speech contest, Alpha Innovation Contest 2019.

Abstract:

Coxsackievirus group B (CVB) is considered as one of the most common pathogens of human viral myocarditis. CVB-induced myocarditis is mainly characterized by the persistence of the virus infection and immune-mediated inflammatory injury. Costimulatory signals are crucial for the activation of adaptive immunity. Our data reveal that the CVB type 3 (CVB3) infection altered the expression profile of costimulatory molecules in host cells. CVB3 infection caused the decrease of PD-1 ligand expression, partially due to the cleavage of AU-rich element binding protein AUF1 by the viral protease 3Cpro, leading to the exacerbated inflammatory injury of the myocardium. Moreover, systemic PD-L1 treatment, which augmented the apoptosis of proliferating lymphocytes, alleviated myocardial inflammatory injury. Our findings suggest that PD1-pathway can be a potential immunologic therapeutic target for CVB-induced myocarditis.

Biography:

The author is a PhD holder from Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, He is a Chief lecturer and former HOD in the Department of food science and technology of federal polytechnic, Bauchi. He is member Nigeria society for microbiology (NSM), Member Nigeria institute of food science and technology. He has published several papers in reputable journals.

Abstract:

The increased use of conventional chemical pesticides over the years has resulted to an adverse effect on the environment and in the destructions of non-target organisms. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) revealed that pesticides: Aldrin & Dieldrin previously used to control termites among other insect pests are probable human carcinogens (Anderson, 2007.  A total of two Entomopathogenic Fungi species (Beauveria bassiana,and Metarrhizia anisopliae ) were isolated both from insect cadavers and the soils within the forest environment ,with the following percentages of occurences  Beauveria bassiana (44.4%)  and Metarrhizia anisopliae (27.2%). The pathogenicity of the two fungal isolates were tested on two insects Lamprina aurata and Galleria mellonella. More pathogenicity was observed from Beauveria bassiana 78.35 (15.67%), Followed by Metarrhizia anisopliae 73.35 (14.67%) for Lamprina aurata and Metarrhizia anisopliae was more pathogenic on Galleria mellonella than Beauveria bassiana with 85.00 (17.00%) and 81.56 (16.33%) respectively. Entomopathogenic fungi are environmentally safe and are natural enemies to insects, therefore entomopathogenic fungi ( biocontrol agents ) are the ideal candidates for integrated pest management in the farms, forest and Green houses.

Biography:

Bijayata Shrestha completed her master’s degree in microbiology (Medical) at the age of 28 years from Tribhuwan University, Nepal. She started working in HAMS hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal in 2009 A.D. right after completing her Undergraduate degree in Medical Laboratory Technology (BMLT) from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, India. She is currently designated as in-charge of Pathology department in the Hospital and her duties and responsibilities include QC analysis, laboratory report authorization and staff duty roster maintenance. Besides, She is also working as a lecturer to PCL Nursing students in HAMS Nursing College since 2010 A.D.

Abstract:

Background: Enteric fever is one of the most common diseases encountered worldwide and is endemic in Nepal. This study was conducted to access antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Salmonella isolates from culture positive cases of enteric fever.

Methods: Altogether 505 blood samples were collected from patients clinically suspected of enteric fever attending HAMS Hospital. All blood samples were cultured by BACTEC method and sub cultured in blood agar and MacConkey agar plates. All isolates were identified by colony characteristics, biochemical tests and serotyping methods. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed by modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method interpreted with CLSI guideline.

Result: Isolation rate of Salmonella species was 3.6%. Among 18 Salmonella isolates, 10 were S. typhi, 8 were S. paratyphi A. The prevalence rate of infection was high among the age group 11-20 years (50%) and among the male patients. However, there was no significant association of enteric fever with gender of patients (p=2.47). All 18 isolates were sensitive to Amoxycillin, Azithromycin, Ceftriaxone and Chloramphenicol, Ciprofloxacin and Ofloxacin. Majority of isolates were sensitive to Cefixime (94.4%), Cotrimoxazole (94.4%) and Cephotaxime (90%). There were no any MDR isolates. Higher percentage of isolates was resistant to Nalidixic acid (87.5%).

Conclusion: The decreased susceptibility to Fluroquinolones of S. typhi and S. Paratyphi A can be correlated with resistance to Nalidixic acid. Commonly used third generation Cephalosporins and rolled back first line drugs be the choice in case of NARS isolates.

Eman M. Marie

Agricultural Microbiology&Virology Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 68, Hadayek-Shoubra 11241, Cairo, Egypt

Title: Isolation and Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Virulent Bacteriophages
Biography:

Eman M. Marie has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from Ain Shams University. She is obtain to the gold medal and honorary diploma from the French Federal Federation,  another gold medal obtained from the Swiss Egyptian Friendship Association and Silver medal and honorary diploma obtained from The 46 th Geneva International Convention for The Young Inventors all these prizes for my international patent about of "Bacterial and Algal Integrated Effectiveness Compounds" were used as a biological wastewater treatments and as a bio-desalination. She has published more than 24 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a free-living bacterium in widely different areas such as plants, soil, water and other moist locations. It is pathogenic to plants and humans. P. aeruginosa causes several disease symptoms to plants such as wet rot and curved leaves. The virulent bacterial viruses of P. aeruginosa were found to be of widespread occurrence in nature and isolated from widely different sources. Bacterial viruses were applied to control pathogenic bacteria in different fields and successfully. Therefore, this work aimed to study the different characteristics of P. aeruginosa lytic phage isolates. Moreover, the biocontrol of P. aeruginosa by lytic phage isolates was also studied. Different physical and molecular characteristics were assayed and determined of P. aeruginosa lytic bacteriophages. Also, the effect of phage isolates on P. aeruginosa as a biocontrol under lab condition was studied.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenic bacterium was isolated from a sewage water sample. Two lytic bacteriophages specific to P. aeruginosa were isolated from same sewage water sample and designated Pa1 and Pa2. Both phage isolates (Pa1 and Pa2) found to be stable in 90ºC and low and high pH levels. The total count of P. aeruginosa decreased after 48h. in broth treated with lytic phages. RAPD-PCR amplification was indicated that the two phage isolates (Pa1 and Pa2) are belonging to two different phage types.

The results of this study indicated that both lytic phage isolates could be used as biological control agents against the plant pathogen P. aeuroginosa.

Biography:

Dr. Habibu received his BSc and MSc in Medical Microbiology from Bayero University, Kano in Nigeria, and a PhD in Molecular Entomology from University of Abertay Dundee, Scotland, UK. His major areas of research interest are; Medical Microbiology & Biotechnology, Molecular Entomology (Insecticides resistance mechanisms in principal malaria vector in Northern Nigeria) and General Biology. Skills includes: Glutathione, Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, Gel electrophoresis. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Malaria parasites transmission in Nigeria is primarily due to the genus Anopheles. This study was carried out with the aim to isolate and identify bacteria from midgut of Anopheles species. A total of 200 Anopheles mosquito larvae, 100 each from Agricultural field sites (strain A) and residential sites (strain R) were collected and reared to adults. Susceptibility bio-assay performed on the adults Anopheles. Anopheles mosquitoes were anesthetized by chloroform and dissected. 70% of ethanol was used for surface sterilization of mosquitoes and laboratory equipment, followed by rinsing Anopheles mosquitoes four times with 1X PBS. Each dissected midgut from the Anopheles mosquitoes was transferred in 1X PBS and squashed, labeled and incubated in the water bath and enriched in tryptic soya broth for 24 h at 35 ± 2 °C.  The culture dependent approach using different mediums was used to investigate the bacterial biodiversity. The microbiota in the two pools of Anopheles was diverse with strain R showing a greater gut bacterial diversity than strain A, with both strains dominated by Gram-negative bacteria. The more resistant strain (Strain A) showed lower bacterial diversity. This finding can be used as a baseline for studying the relationship between microbiota and mosquitoes, and for the development of a new malaria biological control. The gut bacterial populations of Anopheles gambiae could be a crucial determinant of their life histories, and the expression of insecticide resistance.

Biography:

Tomasz Zrodlowski graduated from Pomeranian Medical University in Poland, has completed his training in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care in Poland and France, and currently is doing his Internal Medicine Residency in the United States. He is also a PhD student at the Jagiellonian Medical University in Poland.

Abstract:

Introduction: Standard blood cultures require at least 24-120 hours to be reported as preliminary positive.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare the reliability of Gram staining and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH), for detecting bacteremia in otherwise negative blood culture bottles.

Patients and methods: We performed Gram stain and FISH to 82 sets of negative blood cultures and 82 blood samples taken from post-operative septic patients and 57 blood samples taken from healthy volunteers.

Results: Using Gram stain in 62.2% of blood samples, 35.4% of the negative aerobic bottles, and in 31.7% of the negative anaerobic bottle’s bacteria were visualized. Utilizing FISH, we detected bacteria respectively in 75.6%, 56.1% and 64.6% of samples. Among the blood samples from healthy volunteers, FISH detected bacteremia in 64.9% of the blood while Gram stain detected bacteria in only 38.6%. The time needed to obtain the study results using Gram stain was 1 hour, for FISH 4 hours and for the culture method, considering the duration of growth, 5 days.

Yousef Alaee Mollabashi

Young Researchers and Elite Club, Ardabil Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ardabil, Iran

Title: Identification of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria by biosensors
Biography:

My name is Yousef Alaee Mollabashi and I am a Molecular Cell Microbiologist BSc in Biology. I am Member of Young Researchers and elite Club and Selected in Third National Conference on Biological Sciences in Iran. I have done many researches on antibiotic resistance and alternative methods. In my studies, urinary tract infection was selected as one of the most common diseases available throughout the world resistant to antibiotics and along with rapid identification methods for this infection and therapeutic and antibacterial potential of medicinal plants, nanoparticles, stem cells for killing Bacterial agents have been studied.

Abstract:

Bacteria have different types and some of them are essential for human life and others cause problems such as illness and death and financial loss. The best way to prevent illness or prevent the patient from becoming ill is to identify pathogenic bacteria in the patient's body for drug administration and precise treatment, or even before entering the body in an infected environment. There are common methods for identifying pathogenic bacteria but for some reasons such as low speed, low accuracy, low susceptibility to contamination, high cost, etc. cause problems in identifying the infection. Biosensors are one of the newest methods of identifying contaminants and diseases that don't have problems with conventional methods. The purpose of this article is to draw the attention of audiences and professionals to the high ability of biosensors to detect pathogenic bacteria. One important point in the study of the source literature is the minimal concentration required to identify the infection and the bacteria, which makes biosensors superior to traditional methods. The results of the studies show that due to the low concentration required and low identification the limit of detection by biosensors, the speed and cost are reduced. For example, for the identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by a particular type of biosensor that reported from the DNA of this biosensor the ability to detect a wide range of microbes at shorter speeds and shorter times, and the activity of this biosensor at concentrations of 105-108 CFU/ml did its best. A biosensor for the identification of Yersinia enterocolitica reported a suitable concentration for numerical identification between 104 - 106 CFU/ml and at the same time, the limit of detection of this bacterium by a biosensor was expressed very low and appropriate. For detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a biosensor, the limit of detection of the bacterium was 2 CFU / ml. This study highlights the potential of biosensors for investment and further studies.

Biography:

I Have completed my D.V.M from University of Agriculture Faisalabad and then Mphil degree in microbiology from GCUF Faisalabad. Currently I am doing Ph.D in microbiology from university of agriculture Faisalabad.

Abstract:

Infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) E. coli strains are common both in humans and animals. In particular, the pet animals have been considered as a potential carrier of MDR E. coli. Therefore, this study was designed to detect the ESBL producing E. coli isolates in companion animals, their owners and veterinary professionals.  A total of 105 rectal swabs from pets (n=45), their owners (n=45) and veterinary professionals (n=15) were screened for the presence of ESBL producing E. coli, MDR and their genetic relatedness.

A total of 73/105 (69.5%) ESBL producing E. coli were recovered from this study. ESBL E. coli isolates in dogs (18/22) and dog owners (13/22) were 81.8% and 59%, respectively. ESBL E. coli isolates in cats (17/23) and cat owners (13/23) were 74% and 56.5%, respectively. While these E. coli isolates in veterinary professionals (12/15) were 80 %. Of these, isolates 23/73 (31.5%) isolates showed MDR phenotype. Resistance to ampicillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin AMP-CTX-CIP-F represented the most common pattern of MDR (17.4%). None of the isolate was resistant to tobramycin. Among the ESBL E. coli with MDR, PCR detected blaCTX-M as the most common ESBL genotype (19/23).  CTX-M-1 group was found among all the 19 blaCTX-M positive E. coli. Furthermore, BOX-PCR fingerprints showed distinct clonal groups indicating high genetic diversity among CTX-M-1 producing E. coli isolates. The presence of multidrug resistant E. coli in particular of ESBL class CTX-M-1 in dogs, cats, their owners and veterinary health workers pose a zoonotic threat for the spread of multidrug resistant bacteria.

Biography:

A practicing physician in the field of healthcare in the state of Kerala in India for the last 30 years and very much interested in basic research. My interest is spread across the fever, inflammation and back pain,. I am a writer. I already printed and published nine books in these subjects. I wrote hundreds of articles in various magazines. After scientific studies we have developed 8000 affirmative crosschecking questions. It can explain all queries related with fever.

Abstract:

As you aware, if temperature increases (Absence of fever) after 31 degree Celsius, Warm sensitive neurons increase their firing rate and inhibit Cold sensitive neurons as core temperature increases. As temperature drops, the firing rate of Warm sensitive neurons decreases, reducing their inhibition, and Cold sensitive neurons which respond by increasing their firing rates.

On the contrary to increase of temperature, in fever the firing rate of Warm sensitive neurons decreases, the firing rate of Cold sensitive neurons increases as core temperature increases. inhibit warm sensitive neurons. The temperature increasing and decreasing controlled by the brain. The firing rate of Warm sensitive neurons and Cold sensitive neurons also controlled by the brain.

When the disease becomes threat to life or organs, blood circulation decreases. Temperature of fever will emerges to increase prevailing essential blood circulation.

WBC and their products stimulate the brain to increase temperature by increasing the firing rate of Cold sensitive neurons and decreasing the firing rate of Warm sensitive neurons. And it acts as a protective covering of the body to sustain life.

There is no way other than this for a sensible and discreet brain to increase temperature.

If the aim of   Cold sensitive neurons increasing their firing rates in hypothermia is to increase temperature, then the aim of Cold sensitive neurons increasing their firing rates during fever is also to increase temperature.